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Cardiff BookTalk: Britain’s Internal Borderlands
Cardiff BookTalk: Britain’s Internal Borderlands

Tue, 19 Mar

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Cardiff

Cardiff BookTalk: Britain’s Internal Borderlands

See Meredith Miller at Cardiff University for a talk featuring her new book Fall River (out March 2024)

Time & Location

19 Mar 2024, 19:00 – 21:00

Cardiff, Milk&Sugar, Maindy Rd, Cardiff CF24 4HQ, UK

About the event

*** This is an External Event Organised with Cardiff University ***

Book

Born out of the Tamar River landscape on the border of Cornwall, Fall River traces the relationship between London and the regions of Britain. This  is a story about those who rise up and those who are forgotten, about  the love and the anger that connects them. Blending crime fiction with  the magically real, this novel breaks new ground in genre and  representation.

Meredith Miller uncovers the  scars of industrialism and class division that shape contemporary  Britain. A wealth of unique and brilliant characters brings this story  to life. They inhabit a community that might be anywhere on this island.  They might be any of us.

“A beautifully disquieting, multi-perspectival story… in Miller’s gorgeous prose.” – Elaine Canning, Cultural Institute, Swansea University Meredith Miller was raised on Long Island in New York and came to the UK in 1997. She  earned her PhD at University of Sussex and moved to Wales permanently in  2018. She has also published numerous short stories, scholarly articles  and two monographs. Her critical work focuses on gender/sexuality,  aesthetic distinction and periodical fiction. Kevin Morgan is Professor of Governance and Development in the School of Geography  and Planning at Cardiff University and the former University Dean of  Engagement. One of the common themes running through his research is the  role and significance of place – a theme that looms large in his work  on place-based innovation policies and on the role of cities and regions  in devolved systems of political governance. He is also interested in  the geographical sensibility in creative fiction - Newark in the work of  Philip Roth, Iowa in the work of Marilynne Robinson and the south Wales valleys in the work of Rachel Trezise for example. To what extent does a geographical setting help authors to fashion compelling characters and nuanced identities?

Book

*** This is an External Event Organised with Cardiff University ***

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