An early Honno committee meeting with Luned Meredith, Althea Osmond, Rosanne Reeves, Leigh Verrill-Rhys (l-r) © Suzanne Greenslade

Back in October 1986 Honno was established as a Welsh Women’s Community Co-operative, the ‘Community’ being Wales. This was not a sudden event but a part and reflection of the enthusiasm and excitement which developed amongst women in Wales in political, academic and literary circles in a far-reaching campaign to draw attention to, and transform the sexist attitudes towards the role of the woman in the home and communities of Wales.

In the early 1980s Women’s Sections were established by Plaid Cymru and the Labour Party in Wales; a number of refuges were opened for women in Wales by Welsh Women’s aid; programmes on the history of women were broadcast, produced by new feminist independent companies; a series of articles were published discussing ‘the problems and aspirations of the women of our nation and other nations of the world’ in Asen Adda (Gomer 1975) edited by Ruth Stephens; the title Out of the Shadows (University of Wales Press 1981) by Deirdre Beddoe was published, creating a stir when she announced that Welsh women were invisible in the history of their country and in January 1986, to the great surprise of many, a special edition of the literary male-centered journal Y Traethodydd was dedicated to Welsh language literature and feminist criticism, written jointly by Ceridwen Lloyd-Morgan, Kathryn Curtis, Elin ap Hywel and Marged Haycock. Around this time many students took an interest in, and specialised in women’s studies thus enriching the literary scene in Wales by presenting papers and books on all aspects of the life of women in Wales.

Caroline Oakley, Honno’s Editor, and Eurwen Booth, Committee member, toast Honno, at the 30th celebration. © Maria Wyles

 

In such an atmosphere, unsurprisingly, a group of women from different parts of Wales had the same idea at the same time, i.e. that now was the time to establish a publishing venture promoting writings by the neglected women writers of Wales. Numerous meetings and discussions followed and it was decided to assess the demand by writing to some hundreds of individuals asking them to buy as many £5 shares as they liked (with one vote for each shareholder at AGMs). We were encouraged by the response. We raised around £4000, and it became obvious that there was support for the idea. As a result Honno was founded, under the care of a voluntary executive committee including Kathryn Curtis, Ann Howells, Ceridwen Lloyd-Morgan, Luned Meredith, Althea Osmond, Rosanne Reeves and Leigh Verrill-Rhys.

 

Over 30 years later we are delighted that these determined and passionate women have been recognised, with the Honno founders being included in WEN Wales’s list of 100 legendary Welsh Women.

Some of WEN Wales’s 100 legendary Welsh women with Honno founders Sheleagh Llewellyn, Ceridwen Lloyd-Morgan and Rosanne Reeves (back row, 6,7,8 from left).

However, much more needs to be done, since there are many other female writers waiting to be taken out from the shadows – historical personalities, who worked tirelessly in their communities, and who portrayed their experiences in fiction and fact. As well as continuing to give a voice to the great contemporary women writers of Wales. Without doubt, we still need a publishing house like Honno, the only independent women’s press of note still remaining in the United Kingdom. And so, we look forward confidently to another 30 years!

 

 

 

 


 

Rosanne Reeves, is one of Honno’s founding members, Editor of the Clasuron Honno, and author of Dwy Gymraes, Dwy Gymru: Hanes Bywyd a Gwaith Gwyneth Vaughan a Sara Maria Saunders; Caerdydd: Gwasg Prifysgol Cymru, 2014 .